How To Successfully Navigate A DOL ESOP Investigation

“Dear Sir or Madam…our office has scheduled a review of the above captioned plan to determine compliance with the provisions of ERISA.” A formal notice from the Department of Labor (DOL) can bring a sense of unease to any employee stock ownership plan (ESOP) practitioner. However, by developing an understanding of why DOL ESOP investigations occur and familiarizing oneself with the DOL’s audit practices, navigating one will be less ominous.

What Is A DOL ESOP Investigation?

The DOL enforces the federal laws of retirement plans under the Employment Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA). ERISA provisions grant the DOL authority to conduct investigations of ESOPs and, unlike those conducted by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), it has the discretion to investigate and reinvestigate any plan it so chooses. Because ESOPs fall under the governance of ERISA, fiduciary duty is required to those who administer, manage, or control plan assets and any ESOP fiduciary is required to act solely in the best interests of the plan’s participants.

Beginning in 2005, the DOL’s ESOP review project initially focused on the valuation of privately-held employer securities purchased by the ESOP.  Even more so today, ESOP trustees are under continued scrutiny from the DOL regarding this subject matter. The trustee must continually demonstrate due diligence in analyzing the transaction and determine that the valuation procedures considered when authorizing the share purchase result in the trust’s payment of no more than fair market value (i.e. “adequate consideration”). Ultimately, the DOL monitors whether participants are being overcharged for the stock acquired by the plan. Failure of any ESOP trustee to uphold this duty may result in them being held liable for making the ESOP trust whole, as evidenced by an increase of monetary settlements in recent court rulings.

How To Successfully Navigate A DOL ESOP Investigation

Why Was Our ESOP Selected?

Because the DOL does not detail their selection process, understanding why your ESOP is under investigation remains unclear. They commence for various reasons, including through referrals from other government agencies or media sources, via plan participant complaints, through computer generated targeting (e.g. collecting information on Form 5500), or by random audit. Many of the investigations do not occur until after a fiduciary breach occurs and the severity of any infraction will determine any company/civil penalties or criminal proceedings. Additionally, DOL enforcement agencies typically provide little advance notice, so knowing how to respond before an investigation begins is critical.

What Can We Expect?

The formal investigation process begins after receipt of a notification letter from a DOL regional office. This letter requests an abundance of plan documentation, including:

  • Plan and trust document
  • ESOP board minutes and correspondence
  • ESOP allocation report
  • ESOP trust statements
  • Copies of Form 5500
  • ESOP loan documents
  • Payroll data
  • Service provider agreements

This information must be provided to the investigator within a certain deadline, although extensions may be granted. It is good practice for a company to establish a point of contact (i.e. ERISA legal counsel) to help aid in the information exchange process. This helps to avoid disruptions, maintains organization, and ensures all requested materials are reviewed and properly addressed. Once all requested documentation is received, the DOL conducts on-site visits comprised of in-person interviews, including key personnel, plan fiduciaries, and those involved with the day-to-day operations of the ESOP. During this stage, it is crucial that legal counsel represent those being interviewed since they can detail what to expect and inform those interviewed of their rights during the process.

What Happens Next?

At the end of the audit period, the DOL must decide whether to take any further action. This phase of the DOL ESOP investigation may take several months and, during that time period, the DOL may discontinue communication with the contact person. Ideally, an investigation ends with receipt of a “no action” letter, meaning the DOL has found no improprieties during its audit. To the extent that the DOL ESOP investigation uncovers violations of ERISA, they will issue a Voluntary Compliance Letter. The letter generally details the facts gathered by the DOL during the investigation, outlines the violations that they have uncovered, and invites discussions related to the remedy of such violations. The DOL may also insist on entering into a written settlement agreement, of which, civil penalties may be imposed. Should settlement not be amenable to both parties, the DOL may also provide the IRS with their findings, which may impose further penalties or excise taxes.

In summary, one should not underestimate the seriousness of a DOL ESOP investigation or the resulting outcome. In the interest of transparency, the department does provide online access to its enforcement manual, detailing their internal audit guidelines and checklists. With a thorough review of these documents and an understanding of the general steps of an ESOP DOL investigation, any plan sponsor can successfully navigate one.

Questions regarding the process of ESOP investigations? Contact the Findley consultant you normally work with or Aaron Geibel in the form below.

Published August 28, 2020

Print this article

Copyright © 2020 by Findley, Inc. All rights reserved.

E-Delivery Rule Brings Cost-Relief to Retirement Plan Administration

On May 27, 2020, the Federal Register published the Department of Labor’s final rule that permits employers to use electronic means to fulfill their retirement plan disclosure obligations. (Disclosures required by the Department of Labor as to health and welfare plans are not covered by this safe harbor rule.) The final rule is effective July 27, 2020, but the Department announced it will not take enforcement actions against plan administrators who rely on the safe harbor prior to that date, in light of the government’s broader response to the Covid-19 emergency.

The final rule is substantially similar to the proposed rule issued in October 2019, and briefly discussed in our article here. Long overdue, this rule should go a long way to reduce the costs and hassles of ERISA-required disclosures.

E-Delivery Rule Brings Cost-Relief to Retirement Plan Administration

Voluntary Safe Harbor

The voluntary safe harbor provided by the final rule allows employers to use either website posting or email delivery for the distribution of required communications or “covered documents” to “covered individuals” via electronic addresses. A covered individual is a participant, beneficiary or other individual entitled to covered documents who provides an electronic address. Covered documents include any disclosure required by Title I of ERISA, and include a summary plan description (SPD), a summary of material modifications (SMM) and summary annual report (SAR).  

The electronic address can be an email address or an internet-connected mobile device such as a smartphone. The final rule specifies that only an employer (not a service provider or plan administrator) can assign an electronic address has employment-related purposes other than receipt of electronic disclosures under this safe harbor. In addition, employers cannot assign electronic addresses to non-employees. Those individuals must voluntarily provide electronic addresses.

E-delivery Safe Harbor Requirements

Initial notification

Prior to relying on this safe harbor for electronic disclosure of covered documents, the plan administrator must issue a notification, on paper, to covered individuals that the way they normally receive the required disclosures is changing.  The notice must include the electronic address that will be used, and notice of the right to opt-out of electronic disclosure of covered documents in favor of paper documents. The opt-out right can be global or the plan administrator may provide the opt-out right on a per-disclosure basis.

Notifications of availability on a website

This notice can generally be provided electronically unless a covered individual has opted to receive paper notifications. The electronic notification must be provided each time a new covered document is being posted on the website, or an annual notice of multiple covered documents made available throughout the year can be provided instead. This notice must describe the covered document, describe the right to receive a paper copy, provide an address or hyperlink to the covered document, and inform the covered individual of opt-out rights.

Retention of covered documents on a website

The ERISA-required disclosure must remain on the website for no less than one year, or until superseded by a subsequent version of the covered document.

Email delivery of covered documents

A plan administrator may also deliver covered documents via email. The covered document can be in the body of the email or provided as an attachment. In this case there is no requirement for a “notification of availability” as discussed above. The email must contain the phrase “Disclosure About Your Retirement Plan” in the subject line.

Email content requirements

The email delivering the covered document must briefly describe the document, describe the right to receive a paper copy and notify the covered individual of the right to opt-out of electronic delivery,

Addressing invalid electronic addresses

Plan administrators must ensure that the electronic delivery system alerts them if an electronic address is invalid or does not work. The administrator must attempt to fix the problem, or treat the covered individual as having opted out of electronic delivery.

Termination of employment

Plan administrators must take action to ensure that a covered individual’s electronic address continues to be accurate and operable.

Paperless Communications

This voluntary safe harbor gives plan administrators the opportunity to save the cost of providing all-paper SPDs, SMMs and other ERISA-required covered documents by eliminating the cost of printing and mailing these documents. Many employees, who conduct so much of their lives through electronic media, will welcome paperless communications.

If you would like to know more about this safe harbor for e-delivery and need assistance in implementing it, please contact your Findley consultant, or Sheila Ninneman below.

Published on May 28, 2020

Print this article

Copyright © 2020 by Findley, Inc. All rights reserved.

Coronavirus Market Volatility and Pension Plan Contributions

The Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic’s impact on your family, friends and economy continues to unfold daily. Interest rates are down, and the equity markets are depressed and have been highly volatile. This economic situation will cause revenues of many plan sponsors to stagnate, which will drain cash reserves, and likely lead to layoffs. This is another “perfect storm” for the pension plan, which if the markets don’t normalize, will lead to much higher required pension contributions in the upcoming year. 

When revenues drop significantly, organizations will struggle to meet current and future funding obligations, as well as pay for essential plan operation services.

Seeking Federal Relief

Congress continues to work on additional funding relief and has recently released several changes impacting defined benefit plans.  However, additional relief measures may be contained in possible Phase 4 coronavirus legislation by early April. This relief will likely delay the impact of the current economic situation and allow plan sponsors to make lower contributions than they would have otherwise, but it likely will not permit sponsors to eliminate their long-term obligations. In other words, it will delay the impact of the current market conditions in hopes that the market will rebound after the coronavirus is under control. 

The Consequences for Late Contributions

If at all possible, plan sponsors will want to adhere to the required deadlines for contributions, both the quarterly requirements and any additional amount required by the final due date (8-1/2 months after the end of the plan year). This table shows the consequences for delayed quarterly contributions:

Contribution TimingPenalties
Less than 30 days lateInterest penalty at effective rate plus 5%
More than 30 days lateInterest penalty at effective rate plus 5%
Notification to PBGC**
More than 60 days lateInterest penalty at effective rate plus 5%
Notification to PBGC (due once contribution at least 30 days late)**
Notification to all plan participants

*Approximately 10% payable to the Trust as additional required contributions
**Generally, there is a waiver of the notification for late or missed quarterly contributions if the plan has less than 100 participants.  However, regardless of the size of the plan, the PBGC must be notified if a final minimum required contribution is missed.

Plan sponsors must meet the total required plan year contribution by the final due date, which is 8-1/2 months after the end of the plan year. There is no grace period for this contribution. Organizations that miss this deadline will experience:

  • Disclosure of an unpaid minimum on the U.S. Department of Labor’s Form 5500
  • Interest and penalties beginning immediately
  • An excise tax of 10% of the missed contribution, which is payable on the due date of the final contribution (for plans with a calendar plan year, the deadline for the final 2019 plan year contribution is September 15, 2020 and the deadline for the final 2020 plan year contributions is September 15, 2021), with interest accruing until paid. This tax is paid to the IRS and cannot be paid from plan assets.

Funding Waiver Requests

Organizations that experience temporary business hardship due to the Coronavirus’s (COVID-19) impact on the economy may consider applying to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) for a funding waiver. However, under current law, it is generally cost prohibitive for smaller plans. The IRS user fee is approximately $30,000, which does not include the cost to prepare the request. Also, the waiver does not eliminate the required contribution, but merely allows you to amortize the payment over five years.

The application process for a funding waiver is onerous as organizations must provide extensive information about the company’s financial condition, the pension plan, as well as share details about executive compensation arrangements. In addition, notifications of the waiver request must be sent to plan participants, and the company must consider comments they receive from participants. The IRS also coordinates with the PBGC as it reviews funding waiver requests, seeking analysis and recommendations from the PBGC.

Maintaining Pension Plan Operations

For organizations whose cash flow is being dramatically impacted by the steps being implemented to fight the coronavirus, there are ways to continue essential services of the plan. Fees for most plan operations can be paid from plan assets. Essential services of the plan include:

  • Initiating new retirements or payments to beneficiaries
  • Paying lump sum benefits
  • PBGC insurance premiums
  • Plan audits
  • ERISA counsel services including plan documents and amendments
  • Government form filings
  • Actuarial counseling services
managing pension plan operations during coronavirus market volatility

It’s important to remember that this is a one-year deferral of the cash expense since fees paid from plan assets are generally added to the following year’s minimum required cash contribution. Consult with your ERISA counsel about paying any fees from plan assets as services that are essential to the employer, but not the plan, are generally not payable from plan assets.

Other Ways to Reduce Contributions?

For plan sponsors who deposited contributions in excess of minimum requirements in the past, a prefunding balance or a carryover balance may be available to be used to offset all, or a portion of, a future contribution requirement. A formal election to create or add to the prefunding balance must be made, and there still may be time to do this related to last year’s contribution.  

Plan sponsors with cash flow concerns may consider options of freezing benefits or reducing benefits in order to reduce future contributions. If participants are currently earning new benefits (i.e., your plan is not currently frozen) an organization may be able to amend the plan to eliminate (i.e. freeze) or reduce benefits before they are earned in 2020.

This may not eliminate the required contribution for 2020, but it will reduce it by the value of the benefits that were expected to be earned. However, in order to freeze or reduce the current year’s benefit, the organization must amend the plan before any participant completes the required number of hours during the plan year (typically 1,000 hours, but varies by plan design). 

Freezing or reducing plan benefits requires a plan amendment and a participant notification. Plans with at least 100 participants require at least a 45-day notice before benefits can be reduced or eliminated. Plans with less than 100 participants only require at least a 15-day notice period. For plan sponsors who are considering reducing 2020 plan year benefits, time is of the essence to amend your plan and distribute the proper notification within the timing guidelines.

Eliminating or reducing plan benefits is a tough decision. There are issues other than cash contributions to consider before making a move, including possible financial statement impact (i.e., ASC715 curtailment expense, if applicable) and human resource/employee relations implications.

Questions regarding contribution options for your defined benefit pension plan, contact the Findley consultant you normally work with, or Keith Nichols at KeithNichols@findley.com or 724.933.0631 or Wesley Wickenheiser at Wesley.Wickenheiser@findley.com or 502.253.4625

Published March 26, 2020

Print this article

© 2020 Findley. All Rights Reserved.

2020 Health and Group Benefits Plan Compliance Calendar

Calendar Plan Year & Calendar Employer Tax Year*

2020 Health and Group Benefits Plan Compliance Calendar January through June
2020 Health and Group Benefits Plan Compliance Calendar July through December

January 2020

31   Last day to report on Form W-2 to employees the cost of applicable employer-sponsored coverage under a group health plan

February 2020

28   Paper Filing – Last day for applicable large employer member to file one or more Forms 1094-C and to file Form 1095-C for each employee who was a full-time employee for any month of the calendar year 2019

28   Paper Filing – Last day for person that provides minimum essential health coverage to an individual during calendar year 2019 to file an information return with the IRS reporting the coverage. Filers will use Form 1094-B, Transmittal of Health Coverage Information Returns, to submit Forms 1095-B, Health Coverage, to IRS.

28   Notice of Breach of Unsecured Protected Health Information – breaches affecting fewer than 500 individuals. Last day for covered entities to notify HHS of a breach affecting fewer than 500 individuals. (Covered entities must notify affected individuals of such a breach without unreasonable delay and in no case later than 60 days following the discovery of a breach.)

March 2020

02   Last day to file electronically with DOL Form M-1 annual report for MEWAs (and certain entities claiming exception) for 2019 (without extension)

02   Last day for filers of IRS For 1095-B, Health Coverage, to furnish a copy of Form 1095-B to the person identified as the “responsible individual” on the form for coverage in 2018

02   Last day for an applicable large employer member to furnish a Form 1095-C, Employer-Provided Health Insurance Offer and Coverage, to each of its full-time employees

31   Electronic Filing – Last day for an applicable large employer member to file one or more Forms 1094-C and to file a Form 1095-C for each employee who was a full-time employee for any month of the calendar year 2019 bb

31  Electronic Filing – Last day for person that provides minimum essential coverage to an individual during calendar-year 2018 to file an information return with the IRS reporting the coverage. Filers will use Form 1094-B, Transmittal of Health Insurance Offer and Coverage Information Returns, to submit Forms 1095-B, Health Coverage, to IRS

May 2020

15   Last day (unextended deadline) to file Form 990 series for a 2019 VEBA. An automatic filing extension of 6 months may be requested by filing Form 8868 by the due date of the Form 990

July 2020

28   Last day to furnish Summary of Material Modifications (SMM) to participants and beneficiaries receiving benefits

31   Last day to file Form 5500 for 2019 without extension

31   Last day (unextended deadline) to file Form 5330 and pay excise tax on disqualified benefits underfunded welfare plans

31   Last day (unextended deadline) to file Form 5330 and pay excise tax on certain excess fringe benefits

September 2020

30   Last day to furnish Summary Annual Report (SAR) for 2019 plan year to participants and beneficiaries if an extension to file Form 5500 was not obtained

October 2020

Prior to Oct. 15, 2020 – Medicare Part D Creditable Coverage Notice – Employers offering prescription drug coverage to Medicare Part D eligible individuals must notify those individuals whether the offered prescription drug coverage is creditable coverage. Notice must be provided prior to Oct. 15, 2020.

15   Last day to file Form 5500 with extension

December 2020

15   Last day (with extension) to furnish Summary Annual Report (SAR) for 2019 plan year to participants and beneficiaries

*This calendar is designed to provide a general overview of certain key compliance dates and is not meant to indicate all possible compliance dates that may affect your plan.

Copyright © 2020 by Findley, Inc. All rights reserved.

To access other selected requirements with no specific deadline plus a detailed description of each compliance item, click below.

View 2020 Detailed Health and Welfare Plan Compliance Calendar/Checklist and other selected requirements with no specific deadline

Interested in other compliance calendars?

Defined Benefit

Defined Contribution

Are You Looking for Missing Participants?

The Department of Labor (DOL) continues to focus on missing participants in retirement plans. In recent years, the DOL, in conjunction with the Employee Benefits Security Administration (EBSA), has been auditing retirement plans and reinforcing the actions that plan sponsors must take to locate lost participants and pay the benefits due to them.

“There’s really no more basic fiduciary duty than the duty to operate the plan for the purpose of paying benefits, so falling down here is a serious matter,” explained Preston Rutledge, Assistant Secretary of Labor for EBSA, while speaking at a policy conference. “We can’t just look the other way.”

While formal guidance is primarily directed at terminating plans, DOL auditors still expect sponsors of active, ongoing plans to be routinely searching for missing participants. As mentioned in Pension & Invesments, Plan sponsors under DOL investigation have reported surprising positions taken by some DOL auditors, including:

  • Failure to find a missing participant is a breach of fiduciary duty.
  • A plan which forfeits funds back to the plan until a participant is found is engaging in a prohibited transaction.
  • Sponsors must document their efforts to find missing participants and should try different search methods every year.
missing participants for retirement plans

These Searches Make Sense

Aside from the DOL’s focus, there are a number of practical reasons plan sponsors should address lost participant accounts:

  • There are large amounts of money at issue. In fiscal 2018, the DOL reported recovering $807 million for terminated, vested participants in retirement plans.
  • Missing participants may prevent payment of required minimum distributions (RMDs), which may result in penalties to the employer and participant.
  • Missing participants may prevent payment of death benefits. This is another important reason to maintain up-to-date beneficiary election data.
  • Missing participants may prevent payment of annual cash-out distributions for balances under $5,000. When processed timely, these cash-outs help reduce the number of accounts for which the employer is paying its recordkeeping service.
  • Missing participants may delay plan terminations, requiring another year of audit and governmental filings.

In addition, sponsors should address uncashed checks on a consistent basis to avoid prohibited transactions related to income earned by the trustee on uncashed check accounts. While many recordkeepers and trustees issue periodic reports alerting the sponsor of outstanding checks, the sponsor must conduct an address search or request that those checks be reissued.

Current Guidance

While the retirement industry awaits formal guidance addressing active plans, plan sponsors can refer to prior guidance issued for terminating plans. This guidance offers recommended steps to document attempts to locate missing participants.

The DOL released Field Assistance Bulletin (FAB) 2014-01 listing the fiduciary duties related to missing participants in terminating 401(k) plans (and other defined contribution plans). It requires plan fiduciaries to take all of the following steps to search for missing participants:

  1. Send a notice by certified mail.
  2. Check related plan and employer records.
  3. Contact the participant’s named beneficiary.
  4. Use free internet search tools (such as search engines, public record databases, obituaries, and social media).
  5. If the fiduciary does not find the missing participant during the required steps above, the fiduciary must consider additional search methods that may involve fees (such as, fee-based Internet search services, commercial locator services, or credit reporting agencies). Sponsors may take into account the size of the account balance and may charge associated fees against the account.

Since 2014, other agencies have released similar guidance. The IRS issued a Memorandum in 2017 for when its Employee Plans (EP) examiners should not enforce penalties for missed RMD payments. This memo required the plan to take virtually the same search steps before concluding it would not or could not pay an RMD.

Similarly, when the Pension Benefit Guarantee Corporation (PBGC) expanded its Missing Participants Program to terminating 401(k) plans in 2018, it pointed to the guidance under FAB 2014-01 for its requirement to conduct a “diligent search” before reporting or transferring missing participant accounts to the PBGC.

Handling Small Balances

Many sponsors have adopted distribution provisions to promptly pay out terminated employees with small balances, which can help prevent participants from losing track of their accounts in the first place. The IRS requires balances between $1,000 and $5,000, which are distributed without the participant’s consent, to be rolled into a default IRA. Therefore, most 401(k) plans will only force-pay balances under $1,000 as true cash-out distributions. Even when these cash-outs are paid annually, some of the smallest checks may go uncashed, and end up on the list of “missing participants” to be dealt with another way.

Retirement Clearinghouse, LLC (RCH) recently received approval from the DOL for its Auto-Portability Program, which may help connect participants with their old accounts. This service identifies when an individual with a default IRA has opened a new plan account with a new employer. If the participant does not respond to two letters of notification, RCH then automatically transfers the default IRA into the new plan account. This way, the account follows the participant – even when they take no action. The DOL has given RCH a prohibited transaction exemption (for five years) on fees collected for facilitating rollovers of small balances.

Best Practices

It’s important to be diligent in monitoring the plan for uncashed checks or nonresponsive participants. The DOL has made it clear that this is a fiduciary duty of the plan sponsor. Service providers often can help identify accounts that may need special attention, so sponsors should coordinate efforts to establish proper procedures and designate an individual or team to ensure necessary follow-up efforts are taken

Consider the following questions. Do you:

  • Have a formal procedure for identifying missing participants?
  • Conduct a full plan review for missing participants at least annually? (Consider timing this review with another annual process, such as annual cash-out distributions.)
  • Review uncashed check reports from the trustee? (These are typically made available on a monthly or quarterly basis.)
  • Conduct address searches for returned checks?
  • Document the steps that are taken annually to locate missing participants?

Questions? Contact the Findley consultant you normally work with, or contact Laura Guin, CPC at 615.665.5420 or Laura.Guin@findley.com

Published March 18, 2020

Print this article

© 2020 Findley. All Rights Reserved

2019 Health and Welfare Plans Compliance Calendar/Checklist

Significant Due Dates – Calendar Plan Year & Calendar Employer Tax Year*

2019 Health and Group Benefits Compliance Calendar

January 2019

31   Last day to report on Form W-2 to employees the cost of applicable employer sponsored coverage under a group health plan

February 2019

28   Paper Filing – Last day for applicable large employer member to file one or more Forms 1094-C and to file Form 1095-C for each employee who was a full time employee for any month of the calendar year 2018

28   Paper Filing – Last day for person that provides minimum essential health coverage to an individual during calendar year 2018 to file an information return with the IRS reporting the coverage. Filers will use Form 1094-B, Transmittal of Health Coverage Information Returns, to submit Forms 1095-B, Health Coverage, to IRS.

28   Notice of Breach of Unsecured Protected Health Information – breaches affecting fewer than 500 individuals. Last day for covered entities to notify HHS of a breach affecting fewer than 500 individuals. (Covered entities must notify affected individuals of such a breach without unreasonable delay and in no case later than 60 days following the discovery of a breach.)

March 2019

01   Medicare Part D Creditable Coverage Disclosure to CMS – Last day for employers offering prescription drug coverage to Medicare Part D eligible individuals to disclose to CMS whether coverage is creditable prescription drug coverage by submitting a completed online Creditable Coverage Disclosure to CMS Form

01   Last day to file electronically with DOL Form M-1 annual report for MEWAs (and certain entities claiming exception) for 2018 (without extension)

04   Last day for filers of IRS For 1095-B, Health Coverage, to furnish a copy of Form 1095-B to the person identified as the “responsible individual” on the form for coverage in 2018

04   Last day for an applicable large employer member to furnish a Form 1095-C, Employer-Provided Health Insurance Offer and Coverage, to each of its full-time employees

31   Electronic Filing – Last day for an applicable large employer member to file one or more Forms 1094-C and to file a Form 1095-C for each employee who was a full time employee for any month of the calendar year 2018. [IRS 2018 Instructions for Forms 1094-C and 1095-C provide that, while generally the Forms must be filed by March 31 when filing electronically, for calendar year 2018 the Forms are required to be filed by April 1, 2019 when filing electronically.]

31  Electronic Filing – Last day for person that provides minimum essential coverage to an individual during calendar-year 2018 to file an information return with the IRS reporting the coverage. Filers will use Form 1094-B, Transmittal of Health Insurance Offer and Coverage Information Returns, to submit Forms 1095-B, Health Coverage, to IRS. [The IRS 2018 Instructions for Forms 1094-B and 1095-B provide that, while generally the Forms must be filed by March 31 (when filing electronically) of the year following the calendar year of coverage, for Forms filed in 2019 reporting coverage provided in calendar year 2018 the Forms are required to be filed by April 1, 2019 when filing electronically.]

May 2019

15   Last day (unextended deadline) to file Form 990 series for a 2018 VEBA. An automatic filing extension of 6 months may be requested by filing Form 8868 by the due date of the Form 990

July 2019

29   Last day to furnish Summary of Material Modifications (SMM) to participants and beneficiaries receiving benefits

31   Last day to file Form 5500 for 2018 without extension

31   Last day (unextended deadline) to file Form 5330 and pay excise tax on disqualified benefits under funded welfare plans

31   Last day (unextended deadline) to file Form 5330 and pay excise tax on certain excess fringe benefits

31   Last day for plan sponsor of a self-insured plan to file Form 720 and pay the PCORI fee for 2018 plan year

September 2019

30   Last day to furnish Summary Annual Report (SAR) for 2018 plan year to participants and beneficiaries if an extension to file Form 5500 was not obtained

October 2019

14   Prior to Oct. 15, 2019 – Medicare Part D Creditable Coverage Notice – Employers offering prescription drug coverage to Medicare Part D eligible individuals must notify those individuals whether the offered prescription drug coverage is creditable coverage. Notice must be provided prior to Oct. 15, 2019.

15   Last day to file Form 5500 with extension

December 2019

15   Last day (with extension) to furnish Summary Annual Report (SAR) for 2018 plan year to participants and beneficiaries

*This calendar is designed to provide a general overview of certain key compliance dates and is not meant to indicate all possible compliance dates that may affect your plan.

Copyright © 2019 by Findley, Inc. All rights reserved.

To access other selected requirements with no specific deadline plus a detailed description of each compliance item, click below.

View 2019 Detailed Health and Welfare Plan Compliance Calendar/Checklist and other selected requirements with no specific deadline

Interested in other compliance calendars?

Defined Benefit

Defined Contribution